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Tech jobs in Portugal: interview with Landing.jobs

Portugal continues to expand as a tech hotspot for innovation, investment, and highly skilled talent. We interviewed marketplace Landing.jobs to get an overview of the local scene and its opportunities.

Tech jobs in Portugal: interview with Landing.jobs
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The tech market in Portugal continues to expand as an attractive hotspot globally. Despite these challenging times, it remains one of the most attractive countries for tech companies and professionals to thrive.

Landing.jobs
is a candidate-driven tech careers marketplace that opened its doors in Lisbon back in 2013. We interviewed its CMO, Pedro Moura, to get an overview of the landscape and tips on how to land a tech job in Portugal.


Hi Pedro, thanks for your time! Landing.jobs has been in the Portuguese market for eight years already. How do you feel that the local tech scene has changed during this time?

It has definitely evolved a lot. Back in 2013, tech professionals did not consider start-ups at all. Nowadays, this is the kind of company at the core for this crowd. The relocation of international companies to Portugal due to the quality of its tech talent is also changing the landscape itself, pushing local companies to improve their competitiveness, attracting and retaining talent.

Recently with the pandemic, Portuguese tech professionals have begun to work remotely for companies across-borders, oftentimes as contractors. At the same time, international tech talent is now coming to Portugal like never before - we are in the top 3 ranking of destinations for digital nomads. A lot has changed, and a lot is still changing.
Landing.jobs team at Future.Works Tech Conference

You guys are also known for issuing the “Tech Careers Report”, a yearly guide filled with useful insights. Can you share with us your main takeaways?

I dare to say that the Tech Careers Report is the broadest and most detailed report on the tech talent market in Portugal. It's a cornerstone of our activity, both for individuals and companies, bringing great value for the whole community.

Besides a snapshot on salaries, tech stacks, motivations, education, etc. I think the most interesting part is the year-on-year evolution. For example, the report shows how bootcamps are becoming more and more attractive for people to learn and enter in the tech market. Finally, data about salaries of roles from CTO to Sysadmin is another key information for talent and companies to make more informed decisions.

Best to see it yourselves, here. This report has brought so much to the Portuguese tech market that we decided to go big and run the 2022 survey for the whole world!


Today, Le Wagon and coding bootcamps in general are perceived as a strong educational (but non-traditional) path. Can you tell us your experience with people coming from coding bootcamps and the main differences versus others coming from more traditional studies?

Not based on any quantitative data, but on my perception only, I think people coming from bootcamps try harder. This may change from a person to another but, if I have to point out something, it would be this characteristic.

A top programmer from a renowned university who just goes for the ‘average’ is way less valuable to a company than someone with initial programming skills but with a strong personal motivation to perform, learn and evolve.

We have hired bootcamp graduates at Landing.jobs and have nothing but great things to say. They work hard, have the knowledge to start laying foundations in development and are eager to learn more and gain experience.
Landing.jobs office in Lisbon

As we all know, the pandemic has completely changed the work environment, allowing more and more people to embrace a remote lifestyle. How do you relate with that?

I relate a lot. Personally, I am neither a remote nor an office fundamentalist. Each company and tech professional must choose what's best for them, based on their inclinations and context.

On a broader level, I think remote is supporting a huge movement towards the globalization of tech work, by removing barriers (mostly cultural) that prevent tech professionals from working for companies anywhere. There is a huge need from companies and countries to access a global pool of talent and this simply would not be possible without this globalization process.


Any tips you would like to share with future web developers and data scientists for a successful job search?

Use Landing.Jobs 🙂 Apart from that, choose where and with whom you want to work. The tech market is an inverted one by classical terms: there's more demand (from companies) than offer (from talent), which means that the power is on the tech talent side. Remember this: work hard and well, be respectful but demanding, and own your career!


Great. Thanks again, we wish you a successful new (tech) year!

Read also: Why I decided to learn to code in Lisbon
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